The Max Reddick Experience

THE KINDLE EDITION IS FREE TODAY (07/20): The Ghanaian Goldilocks  Written by Tamara Pizzoli and illustrated by Phil Howell.
Set in Accra, Ghana, The Ghanaian Goldilocks is a modern twist on the classic Goldilocks fairytale. Like traditional kente cloth, West African culture and themes are woven seamlessly into the story of a boy with sun lightened hair named Kofi, better known to his friends and family as Goldilocks. Like the Goldilocks in the traditional tale, Kofi has been known to get into some trouble here and there, but it’s an unexpected visit to a neighbor’s house that teaches him a valuable lesson of a lifetime.

THE KINDLE EDITION IS FREE TODAY (07/20): The Ghanaian Goldilocks  Written by Tamara Pizzoli and illustrated by Phil Howell.

Set in Accra, Ghana, The Ghanaian Goldilocks is a modern twist on the classic Goldilocks fairytale. Like traditional kente cloth, West African culture and themes are woven seamlessly into the story of a boy with sun lightened hair named Kofi, better known to his friends and family as Goldilocks. Like the Goldilocks in the traditional tale, Kofi has been known to get into some trouble here and there, but it’s an unexpected visit to a neighbor’s house that teaches him a valuable lesson of a lifetime.

thesmithian:

mannybricks:

© Perry Riddle / National Archives, July 1975, Michigan Avenue, Chicago
This photo is part of the exhibition Documerica - Searching for the Seventies at Lawrence F. O’Brien Gallery / National Archives, Washington DC, USA. The exhibition is free and open to the public.
Check this post for more photos and information about the exhibition.
Exhibition dates:
» find more exhibitions here «

[look of the hour]

thesmithian:

mannybricks:

© Perry Riddle / National Archives, July 1975, Michigan Avenue, Chicago

This photo is part of the exhibition Documerica - Searching for the Seventies at Lawrence F. O’Brien Gallery / National Archives, Washington DC, USA. The exhibition is free and open to the public.

Check this post for more photos and information about the exhibition.

Exhibition dates:

» find more exhibitions here «

[look of the hour]

Germany’s Black Holocaust: 1890-1945: Details Never Before Revealed! by Firpo W. Carr
In the 1890s Blacks were tortured in German concentration camps in Southwest Africa (now called Namibia) when Adolph Hitler was only a child. Colonial German doctors conducted unspeakable medical experiments on these emaciated helpless Africans decades before such atrocities were ever visited upon the Jews. Thousands of Africans were massacred. Regrettably, historians neglected to properly register the slaughter—that is, to lift it from the footnote in history that it had been relegated to—until now. 
In an attempt to give the incidents their rightful recognition in the historical context of the Holocaust, Dr. Firpo W. Carr has authored a new book entitled, Germany’s Black Holocaust: 1890–1945. In it, he reveals the startling hidden history of Black victims of the Holocaust. The mayhem and carnage date back to the turn of the 20th century, many years before there were ever any other unfortunate victims—Jew or Gentile—of the Holocaust. Carr conducted three incredibly revealing interviews with: (1) a Black female Holocaust victim; (2) the Black commanding officer who liberated 8,000 Black men from a concentration camp; and (3) an African American medic from the all-Black medical unit that was responsible for retrieving thousands of dead bodies from Dachau. (White medical units were spared the gruesome task.) 
"Kay," the Black female Holocaust survivor, laments: "You cannot possibly comprehend the anger I have in me because of being experimented on in Dachau, and being called ‘nigger girl’ and ‘blacky’ while growing up." Testimonials from the Black commanding officer and African American medic are memorialized, for the first time ever, in Carr’s book. 
The research is based on voluminous documentation, and more. If you are like most people, you simply have never heard the unbelievable story of Black victims of the Holocaust. You are invited to read about the human spirit’s triumph over events that occurred during this horrible piece of hidden history. 
[book link]

Germany’s Black Holocaust: 1890-1945: Details Never Before Revealed! by Firpo W. Carr

In the 1890s Blacks were tortured in German concentration camps in Southwest Africa (now called Namibia) when Adolph Hitler was only a child. Colonial German doctors conducted unspeakable medical experiments on these emaciated helpless Africans decades before such atrocities were ever visited upon the Jews. Thousands of Africans were massacred. Regrettably, historians neglected to properly register the slaughter—that is, to lift it from the footnote in history that it had been relegated to—until now.

In an attempt to give the incidents their rightful recognition in the historical context of the Holocaust, Dr. Firpo W. Carr has authored a new book entitled, Germany’s Black Holocaust: 1890–1945. In it, he reveals the startling hidden history of Black victims of the Holocaust. The mayhem and carnage date back to the turn of the 20th century, many years before there were ever any other unfortunate victims—Jew or Gentile—of the Holocaust. Carr conducted three incredibly revealing interviews with: (1) a Black female Holocaust victim; (2) the Black commanding officer who liberated 8,000 Black men from a concentration camp; and (3) an African American medic from the all-Black medical unit that was responsible for retrieving thousands of dead bodies from Dachau. (White medical units were spared the gruesome task.)

"Kay," the Black female Holocaust survivor, laments: "You cannot possibly comprehend the anger I have in me because of being experimented on in Dachau, and being called ‘nigger girl’ and ‘blacky’ while growing up." Testimonials from the Black commanding officer and African American medic are memorialized, for the first time ever, in Carr’s book.

The research is based on voluminous documentation, and more. If you are like most people, you simply have never heard the unbelievable story of Black victims of the Holocaust. You are invited to read about the human spirit’s triumph over events that occurred during this horrible piece of hidden history.

[book link]

classicladiesofcolor:

Before she became known as the “replacement” mom on The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air, Daphne Maxwell Reid was the first African American woman named Homecoming Queen at Northwestern University and the first Black woman to grace the cover of Glamour Magazine. 

classicladiesofcolor:

Before she became known as the “replacement” mom on The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air, Daphne Maxwell Reid was the first African American woman named Homecoming Queen at Northwestern University and the first Black woman to grace the cover of Glamour Magazine. 

(via eternallybeautifullyblack)

soulbrotherv2:

Slavery’s Exiles: The Story of the American Maroons by Sylviane A. Diouf

Over more than two centuries men, women, and children escaped from slavery to make the Southern wilderness their home. They hid in the mountains of Virginia and the low swamps of South Carolina; they stayed in the neighborhood or paddled their way to secluded places; they buried themselves underground or built comfortable settlements. Known as maroons, they lived on their own or set up communities in swamps or other areas where they were not likely to be discovered.
 
Although well-known, feared, celebrated or demonized at the time, the maroons whose stories are the subject of this book have been forgotten, overlooked by academic research that has focused on the Caribbean and Latin America. Who the American maroons were, what led them to choose this way of life over alternatives, what forms of marronage they created, what their individual and collective lives were like, how they organized themselves to survive, and how their particular story fits into the larger narrative of slave resistance are questions that this book seeks to answer. To survive, the American maroons reinvented themselves, defied slave society, enforced their own definition of freedom and dared create their own alternative to what the country had delineated as being black men and women’s proper place. Audacious, self-confident, autonomous, sometimes self-sufficient, always self-governing; their very existence was a repudiation of the basic tenets of slavery. [book link]

soulbrotherv2:

Over more than two centuries men, women, and children escaped from slavery to make the Southern wilderness their home. They hid in the mountains of Virginia and the low swamps of South Carolina; they stayed in the neighborhood or paddled their way to secluded places; they buried themselves underground or built comfortable settlements. Known as maroons, they lived on their own or set up communities in swamps or other areas where they were not likely to be discovered.
 
Although well-known, feared, celebrated or demonized at the time, the maroons whose stories are the subject of this book have been forgotten, overlooked by academic research that has focused on the Caribbean and Latin America. Who the American maroons were, what led them to choose this way of life over alternatives, what forms of marronage they created, what their individual and collective lives were like, how they organized themselves to survive, and how their particular story fits into the larger narrative of slave resistance are questions that this book seeks to answer. To survive, the American maroons reinvented themselves, defied slave society, enforced their own definition of freedom and dared create their own alternative to what the country had delineated as being black men and women’s proper place. Audacious, self-confident, autonomous, sometimes self-sufficient, always self-governing; their very existence was a repudiation of the basic tenets of slavery. [book link]

(via eternallybeautifullyblack)