The Max Reddick Experience

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MISSING: 12-year-old boy from Montgomery County

WHEATON, Md. (WUSA9) — Montgomery County Police need your help locating a missing 12-year-old from Wheaton.
Rashad Williams, of the 3300 block of Hewitt Avenue has been missing since September 5th.
Williams is described as a black male, 4’8” tall and weighing 100 pounds. Williams has brown eyes and medium length brown hair worn in twists, police said.
Williams frequents the Aspen Hill/Layhill area of Wheaton, the Westfield Wheaton Mall and downtown Silver Spring, police said.
Anyone with information regarding the whereabouts of Rashad Williams is asked to call the Montgomery County Police Special Victims Investigative Division at 240-773-5300, or the police non-emergency number at 301-279-8000 (24-hour line). Callers may remain anonymous.


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cleophatrajones:

dynastylnoire:

dulceetdecorus:

MISSING: 12-year-old boy from Montgomery County

WHEATON, Md. (WUSA9) — Montgomery County Police need your help locating a missing 12-year-old from Wheaton.

Rashad Williams, of the 3300 block of Hewitt Avenue has been missing since September 5th.

Williams is described as a black male, 4’8” tall and weighing 100 pounds. Williams has brown eyes and medium length brown hair worn in twists, police said.

Williams frequents the Aspen Hill/Layhill area of Wheaton, the Westfield Wheaton Mall and downtown Silver Spring, police said.

Anyone with information regarding the whereabouts of Rashad Williams is asked to call the Montgomery County Police Special Victims Investigative Division at 240-773-5300, or the police non-emergency number at 301-279-8000 (24-hour line). Callers may remain anonymous.

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Baseball’s Secret Pioneer

William Edward White, the first black player in major-league history, lived his life as a white man.
By Peter Morris and Stefan Fatsis

n June 22, 1937, Joe Louis knocked out James Braddock with a right to the jaw to become the world heavyweight champion. At a time when Major League Baseball was still a decade from integration, Louis’ victory in Chicago’s Comiskey Park was a triumph for black America, and for racial progress. “What my father did was enable white America to think of him as an American, not as a black,” Joe Louis Jr. told ESPN in 1999. “By winning, he became white America’s first black hero.”




Three months before the fight, another notable moment involving race and sports occurred in the same city: the death of a 76-year-old man named William Edward White, of blood poisoning after a slip on an icy sidewalk and a broken arm. Fifty-eight years earlier, White played a single game for the Providence Grays of baseball’s National League to become, as best as can be determined, the first African-American player in big-league history. Unlike Louis’ knockout, though, White’s death merited no coverage in the local or national press. A clue as to why can be found in cursive handwriting in box No. 4 on White’s death certificate, which is labeled COLOR OR RACE. The box reads: “White.” 
[Continue reading article at Slate.]

Baseball’s Secret Pioneer

William Edward White, the first black player in major-league history, lived his life as a white man.

By Peter Morris and Stefan Fatsis

n June 22, 1937, Joe Louis knocked out James Braddock with a right to the jaw to become the world heavyweight champion. At a time when Major League Baseball was still a decade from integration, Louis’ victory in Chicago’s Comiskey Park was a triumph for black America, and for racial progress. “What my father did was enable white America to think of him as an American, not as a black,” Joe Louis Jr. told ESPN in 1999. “By winning, he became white America’s first black hero.”

Three months before the fight, another notable moment involving race and sports occurred in the same city: the death of a 76-year-old man named William Edward White, of blood poisoning after a slip on an icy sidewalk and a broken arm. Fifty-eight years earlier, White played a single game for the Providence Grays of baseball’s National League to become, as best as can be determined, the first African-American player in big-league history. Unlike Louis’ knockout, though, White’s death merited no coverage in the local or national press. A clue as to why can be found in cursive handwriting in box No. 4 on White’s death certificate, which is labeled COLOR OR RACE. The box reads: “White.” 

[Continue reading article at Slate.]

Civil War massacre launched reparations debate

By Gillian Brockell
On a rainy night in early 1865, Secretary of War Edwin Stanton arrived in Savannah, Ga. — which the Union had captured weeks earlier — with a question: What should become of newly free black people? It was a question that many in power had been asking for some time. What was different this time was to whom the question was posed: the newly free black people themselves.
It was a visit born of a massacre about a month before, and it launched a debate that continues to this day.
[Continue reading article and find out more about the beginnings of this debate at The Washington Post.]

Civil War massacre launched reparations debate

By Gillian Brockell

On a rainy night in early 1865, Secretary of War Edwin Stanton arrived in Savannah, Ga. — which the Union had captured weeks earlier — with a question: What should become of newly free black people? It was a question that many in power had been asking for some time. What was different this time was to whom the question was posed: the newly free black people themselves.

It was a visit born of a massacre about a month before, and it launched a debate that continues to this day.

[Continue reading article and find out more about the beginnings of this debate at The Washington Post.]

Brown Girl Dreaming by Jacqueline Woodson
Raised in South Carolina and New York, Woodson always felt halfway home in each place. In vivid poems, she shares what it was like to grow up as an African American in the 1960s and 1970s, living with the remnants of Jim Crow and her growing awareness of the Civil Rights movement. Touching and powerful, each poem is both accessible and emotionally charged, each line a glimpse into a child’s soul as she searches for her place in the world. Woodson’s eloquent poetry also reflects the joy of finding her voice through writing stories, despite the fact that she struggled with reading as a child. Her love of stories inspired her and stayed with her, creating the first sparks of the gifted writer she was to become.
[book link]

Brown Girl Dreaming by Jacqueline Woodson

Raised in South Carolina and New York, Woodson always felt halfway home in each place. In vivid poems, she shares what it was like to grow up as an African American in the 1960s and 1970s, living with the remnants of Jim Crow and her growing awareness of the Civil Rights movement. Touching and powerful, each poem is both accessible and emotionally charged, each line a glimpse into a child’s soul as she searches for her place in the world. Woodson’s eloquent poetry also reflects the joy of finding her voice through writing stories, despite the fact that she struggled with reading as a child. Her love of stories inspired her and stayed with her, creating the first sparks of the gifted writer she was to become.

[book link]

Help Me to Find My People: The African American Search for Family Lost in Slavery by Heather Andrea Williams
After the Civil War, African Americans placed poignant “information wanted” advertisements in newspapers, searching for missing family members. Inspired by the power of these ads, Heather Andrea Williams uses slave narratives, letters, interviews, public records, and diaries to guide readers back to devastating moments of family separation during slavery when people were sold away from parents, siblings, spouses, and children. Williams explores the heartbreaking stories of separation and the long, usually unsuccessful journeys toward reunification. Examining the interior lives of the enslaved and freed people as they tried to come to terms with great loss, Williams grounds their grief, fear, anger, longing, frustration, and hope in the history of American slavery and the domestic slave trade. 
Williams follows those who were separated, chronicles their searches, and documents the rare experience of reunion. She also explores the sympathy, indifference, hostility, or empathy expressed by whites about sundered black families. Williams shows how searches for family members in the post-Civil War era continue to reverberate in African American culture in the ongoing search for family history and connection across generations.
[book link]

Help Me to Find My People: The African American Search for Family Lost in Slavery by Heather Andrea Williams

After the Civil War, African Americans placed poignant “information wanted” advertisements in newspapers, searching for missing family members. Inspired by the power of these ads, Heather Andrea Williams uses slave narratives, letters, interviews, public records, and diaries to guide readers back to devastating moments of family separation during slavery when people were sold away from parents, siblings, spouses, and children. Williams explores the heartbreaking stories of separation and the long, usually unsuccessful journeys toward reunification. Examining the interior lives of the enslaved and freed people as they tried to come to terms with great loss, Williams grounds their grief, fear, anger, longing, frustration, and hope in the history of American slavery and the domestic slave trade. 

Williams follows those who were separated, chronicles their searches, and documents the rare experience of reunion. She also explores the sympathy, indifference, hostility, or empathy expressed by whites about sundered black families. Williams shows how searches for family members in the post-Civil War era continue to reverberate in African American culture in the ongoing search for family history and connection across generations.

[book link]