The Max Reddick Experience

sinidentidades:

Today Also Marks the Anniversary of Emmett Till’s Murder
On August 28, 1955—eight years before the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom—Emmett Till was murdered in Money, Mississippi for allegedly flirting with a white store clerk, Carolyn Bryant.
Bryant’s husband, Roy, and his half brother J. W.  Milam kidnapped the 14-year-old Chicagoan from his great uncle’s home and beat him, shot him in the head, tied his body to a large metal cotton gin fan with barbed wire and dropped him into the Tallahatchie River. Three days later the teenager’s bloated, mutilated body was pulled from the river.  
Till’s mother, Mamie, insisted on an open-casket funeral for her only son so that the world might see the brutality he suffered. Two Black publications, Jet and The Chicago Defender, ran pictures of Till’s casket. 
Despite overwhelming evidence of their guilt, the two white men who killed Emmett Till were acquitted by an all-white jury. They went on to sell the story of murdering the teenager to Look magazine for $4,000.
The horrific death of Emmett Till is largely credited with intensifying the push for Black voter registration in Mississippi and serving as a catalyst for the civil rights movement in general.

sinidentidades:

Today Also Marks the Anniversary of Emmett Till’s Murder

On August 28, 1955—eight years before the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom—Emmett Till was murdered in Money, Mississippi for allegedly flirting with a white store clerk, Carolyn Bryant.

Bryant’s husband, Roy, and his half brother J. W.  Milam kidnapped the 14-year-old Chicagoan from his great uncle’s home and beat him, shot him in the head, tied his body to a large metal cotton gin fan with barbed wire and dropped him into the Tallahatchie River. Three days later the teenager’s bloated, mutilated body was pulled from the river.  

Till’s mother, Mamie, insisted on an open-casket funeral for her only son so that the world might see the brutality he suffered. Two Black publications, Jet and The Chicago Defender, ran pictures of Till’s casket. 

Despite overwhelming evidence of their guilt, the two white men who killed Emmett Till were acquitted by an all-white jury. They went on to sell the story of murdering the teenager to Look magazine for $4,000.

The horrific death of Emmett Till is largely credited with intensifying the push for Black voter registration in Mississippi and serving as a catalyst for the civil rights movement in general.

(via blacksupervillain)

Source sinidentidades

Reblogged from HUELGA

gallifreyglo:

securelyinsecure:

Throwback - Celebrities Recreate Iconic Covers for Ebony Magazine’s 65th Anniversary (2010)

To celebrate its 65th anniversary issue and icons of the past and present, EBONY magazine asked their favorite entertainers to pose in modern-day recreations of those covers for a one-of-a-kind look back at the past.

Featuring: Regina King (as Eartha Kitt), Mary J. Blige (as Diana Ross), Nia Long (as Dorothy Dandridge), John Legend (as Duke Ellington), Lamman Rucker (as Richard Roundtree), Taraji P. Henson (as Diahann Carroll), Blair Underwood (as Sidney Poitier), Jurnee Smollett (as Lena Horne), Usher Raymond (as Sammy Davis, Jr.), and Samuel L. Jackson (as Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.), among others.

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(via highplainsgrifter)

This Nonviolent Stuff’ll Get You Killed: How Guns Made the Civil Rights Movement Possible  by Charles E. Cobb Jr.
Visiting Martin Luther King Jr. at the peak of the Montgomery, Alabama bus boycott, journalist William Worthy almost sat on a loaded pistol. “Just for self defense,” King assured him. It was not the only weapon King kept for such a purpose; one of his advisors remembered the reverend’s Montgomery, Alabama home as “an arsenal.”
Like King, many ostensibly “nonviolent” civil rights activists embraced their constitutional right to self-protection—yet this crucial dimension of the Afro-American freedom struggle has been long ignored by history. In This Nonviolent Stuff’ll Get You Killed, civil rights scholar Charles E. Cobb Jr. describes the vital role that armed self-defense played in the survival and liberation of black communities in America during the Southern Freedom Movement of the 1960s. 
[book link]

This Nonviolent Stuff’ll Get You Killed: How Guns Made the Civil Rights Movement Possible  by Charles E. Cobb Jr.

Visiting Martin Luther King Jr. at the peak of the Montgomery, Alabama bus boycott, journalist William Worthy almost sat on a loaded pistol. “Just for self defense,” King assured him. It was not the only weapon King kept for such a purpose; one of his advisors remembered the reverend’s Montgomery, Alabama home as “an arsenal.”

Like King, many ostensibly “nonviolent” civil rights activists embraced their constitutional right to self-protection—yet this crucial dimension of the Afro-American freedom struggle has been long ignored by history. In This Nonviolent Stuff’ll Get You Killed, civil rights scholar Charles E. Cobb Jr. describes the vital role that armed self-defense played in the survival and liberation of black communities in America during the Southern Freedom Movement of the 1960s. 

[book link]

yagazieemezi:

Emmanual Afolabi: The Journey

New work by contributing photographer Emmanuel Afolabi for yagazieemezi.com

"I caught up with Eli Fola, Nigerian born saxophonist and lead singer of NYC’s based world music band known as Dahka Band,  a multi-cultural world band with members  from Algeria, Turkey, Ecuador, and The Philippines. Eli Fola was introduced to music at the age of 9, heavily influenced by the church his parents were a part of in Nigeria. It was there that he joined the choir and there he started learning to play different musical instruments like African drums, congas, piano, and eventually settling with the saxophone."

Keep reading + more pictures

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Dedicated to the Cultural Preservation of the African Aesthetic

(via thaeversotalentedmrg)

The House at the End of the Road: The Story of Three Generations of an Interracial Family in the American South by W. Ralph Eubanks
In 1914, in defiance of his middle-class landowning family, a young white man named James Morgan Richardson married a light-skinned black woman named Edna Howell. Over more than twenty years of marriage, they formed a strong family and built a house at the end of a winding sandy road in South Alabama, a place where their safety from the hostile world around them was assured, and where they developed a unique racial and cultural identity. Jim and Edna Richardson were Ralph Eubanks’s grandparents.
Part personal journey, part cultural biography, The House at the End of the Road examines a little-known piece of this country’s past: interracial families that survived and prevailed despite Jim Crow laws, including those prohibiting mixed-race marriage.
[book link]

The House at the End of the Road: The Story of Three Generations of an Interracial Family in the American South by W. Ralph Eubanks

In 1914, in defiance of his middle-class landowning family, a young white man named James Morgan Richardson married a light-skinned black woman named Edna Howell. Over more than twenty years of marriage, they formed a strong family and built a house at the end of a winding sandy road in South Alabama, a place where their safety from the hostile world around them was assured, and where they developed a unique racial and cultural identity. Jim and Edna Richardson were Ralph Eubanks’s grandparents.

Part personal journey, part cultural biography, The House at the End of the Road examines a little-known piece of this country’s past: interracial families that survived and prevailed despite Jim Crow laws, including those prohibiting mixed-race marriage.

[book link]