The Max Reddick Experience

On this date, June 19, in 1968, fifty thousand demonstrators participated in Solidarity Day March of Poor People’s Campaign. Marchers walked from Washington Monument to Lincoln Monument, where they were addressed by Vice-president Humphrey, presidential candidate Eugene McCarthy, Coretta Scott King and Ralph Abernathy.  [from Black Facts]

The Poor People’s Campaign was a 1968 effort to gain economic justice for poor people in the United States. It was organized by Martin Luther King, Jr. and the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, and carried out in the wake of King’s assassination.
The Campaign demanded economic and human rights for poor Blacks, Chicanos, Native Americans, and Whites. After presenting an organized set of demands to Congress and executive agencies, participants set up a 3000-person tent city on the Washington Mall, where they stayed for six weeks.  [Continue reading.]

For further reading and research, also see:
The Last Crusade: Martin Luther King Jr., The FBI, and the Poor People’s Campaign by Gerald D. McKnight.   [book link]
Power to the Poor: Black-Brown Coalition and the Fight for Economic Justice, 1960-1974 (Justice, Power, and Politics) by Gordon K. Mantler.  [book link]
Poor People’s Movements: Why They Succeed, How They Fail by Frances Fox Piven and Richard Cloward.  [book link]

On this date, June 19, in 1968, fifty thousand demonstrators participated in Solidarity Day March of Poor People’s Campaign. Marchers walked from Washington Monument to Lincoln Monument, where they were addressed by Vice-president Humphrey, presidential candidate Eugene McCarthy, Coretta Scott King and Ralph Abernathy.  [from Black Facts]

The Poor People’s Campaign was a 1968 effort to gain economic justice for poor people in the United States. It was organized by Martin Luther King, Jr. and the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, and carried out in the wake of King’s assassination.

The Campaign demanded economic and human rights for poor Blacks, Chicanos, Native Americans, and Whites. After presenting an organized set of demands to Congress and executive agencies, participants set up a 3000-person tent city on the Washington Mall, where they stayed for six weeks.  [Continue reading.]

For further reading and research, also see:

The Last Crusade: Martin Luther King Jr., The FBI, and the Poor People’s Campaign by Gerald D. McKnight.   [book link]

Power to the Poor: Black-Brown Coalition and the Fight for Economic Justice, 1960-1974 (Justice, Power, and Politics) by Gordon K. Mantler.  [book link]

Poor People’s Movements: Why They Succeed, How They Fail by Frances Fox Piven and Richard Cloward.  [book link]

Notes

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