The Max Reddick Experience

On this date, August 24, in 1950, Edith Sampson is appointed as the member-at-large of the United States Commission for United Nations Education, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO), becoming the first Black ever to receive such as appointment.

Black History Spotlight for August 24: Judge Edith Sampson
Edith Spurlock Sampson was born in October of the early 1900s. She grew up in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, in a family of eight children. When she was fourteen, she left home to work in a fish market to support her family.
After graduating high school, she worked with a social work organization named Associated Charities. Shortly thereafter she began to attend the New York School of Social Work.
Sampson was encouraged to attend law school by a professor who noticed her smarts in class. But she finished her social work degree instead. She married Rufus Sampson and moved to Chicago. She worked at the Illinois Children’s Home and Aid Society and the YWCA.
When Sampson was once again encouraged by her professor to go to law school, she took his advice. She took night classes at the John Marshall Law School while also holding down a full time job as a social worker. When Sampson graduated in 1925, she was ranked highest in her class of 95 students and received a dean’s commendation.  [Continue reading at The North Dallas Gazette.]

On this date, August 24, in 1950, Edith Sampson is appointed as the member-at-large of the United States Commission for United Nations Education, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO), becoming the first Black ever to receive such as appointment.

Black History Spotlight for August 24: Judge Edith Sampson

Edith Spurlock Sampson was born in October of the early 1900s. She grew up in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, in a family of eight children. When she was fourteen, she left home to work in a fish market to support her family.

After graduating high school, she worked with a social work organization named Associated Charities. Shortly thereafter she began to attend the New York School of Social Work.

Sampson was encouraged to attend law school by a professor who noticed her smarts in class. But she finished her social work degree instead. She married Rufus Sampson and moved to Chicago. She worked at the Illinois Children’s Home and Aid Society and the YWCA.

When Sampson was once again encouraged by her professor to go to law school, she took his advice. She took night classes at the John Marshall Law School while also holding down a full time job as a social worker. When Sampson graduated in 1925, she was ranked highest in her class of 95 students and received a dean’s commendation.  [Continue reading at The North Dallas Gazette.]

Notes

  1. sheilastansbury reblogged this from soulbrotherv2
  2. withtheseamericanthighs reblogged this from eternallybeautifullyblack
  3. liddygoo reblogged this from yonggukscock
  4. yonggukscock reblogged this from eternallybeautifullyblack
  5. blackliberalwoman reblogged this from eternallybeautifullyblack
  6. candylacedpoison reblogged this from eternallybeautifullyblack
  7. eternallybeautifullyblack reblogged this from soulbrotherv2
  8. rnbhiphopluv2 reblogged this from soulbrotherv2
  9. yourelaughingbutimserious reblogged this from soulbrotherv2
  10. soulbrotherv2 posted this